Monday, December 31, 2012

Dykes Library closing 3PM Monday, December 31

Dykes Library will close this afternoon at 3PM due to inclement weather and the holiday.
We will reopen Wednesday, January 2 with regular hours of 7:30AM - 11:00PM.
Happy New Year!

Thursday, December 27, 2012

Henry Stewart Talks - December updates

 December updates 
There is another new series added entitled Glycobiology.

A special thank you to Dr. Gregory Kopf for making this resource available to the campus community.

Monday, December 24, 2012

Henry Stewart Talks - November updates

A new series was added to Henry Stewart Talks:  Calcium Signaling II: Calcium and Disease.  There have also been talks added the the series Biomarkers: the path forward to highly sensitive and specific molecular diagnostics.  A special thank you to Dr. Gregory Kopf for making this resource available to the University community. 

Henry Stewart Talks

Monday, November 26, 2012

AAMC publication "Diversity in Medical Education: Facts & Figures 2012"

AAMC has published "Diversity in Medical Education: Facts and Figures 2012," the 17th data book in the Facts & Figures Data Series. This publication provides students, medical educators and administrators, researchers, policymakers, and the general public with a compendium of detailed statistical information on race and ethnicity and gender in medical education in the United States for the 2011 academic year as well as nearly a decade’s worth of trending information for select topics. The publication also includes data related to the pre-college component of the education pipeline leading to the M.D. degree and other health sciences and health professions careers.

Diversity in Medical Education: Facts & Figures 2012

Tuesday, November 20, 2012

Workaround for viewing PDF articles in Ebscohost

We've recently had reports from students unable to view PDF articles in Ebscohost databases on their home computers. Databases we've heard about include Health Business Full Text Elite and Professional Development Collection. CINAHL is likely affected as well.
The problems seem to be specific to a combination of Ebscohost, Adobe Reader, and Internet Explorer 9. Ebscohost embeds a PDF viewer, but you should be able to workaround the problem by opening the PDF in a new browser window:
  1. First, add your articles to a Folder in Ebscohost then go to your Folder.
  2. Right-click on one of the PDF Full Text links there.
  3. Select either "Open in new window" to view the PDF in your browser or "Save target as..." to immediately download and save the PDF file.
Watch our short video below for a demonstration.

Aside from the workaround demonstrated in the video, here are some possible, but unverified, long-term solutions to the problem:
  • We've heard from one campus Support Technician that just uninstalling IE9 may resolve similar problems in other browsers you might have installed, such as Firefox and Chrome. IE9 includes many additional security features that interfere with opening and viewing files from the web.
  • If your computer's operating system is a 64-bit version of Windows, try switching to 32-bit Windows and 32-bit browsers.

Tuesday, November 6, 2012

Basic LTI in Ares, Ares Virtual Conference Notes

Following are my notes from today's Basic LTI session of Atlas System's Ares Virtual Conference. We're planning to take advantage of Basic LTI once Blackboard replaces Angel as the primary course management system on campus. Basic LTI between Ares and LCMS+ is also likely assuming LCMS+ adds support for Basic LTI.

Atlas Systems Ares Course Reserves Basic LTI webinar

LTI v1.0, released May 2010
  : No support for callback messages from Ares to CMS. Such callbacks are supported in LTI v1.1, but Ares never passes data back to CMS. Data flow is one-way from CMS to Ares:
  : CMS -> Basic LTI -> Ares Web Service -> Ares Web DLL (pages)
Basic LTI points to "responder", Ares in this case.
  : Term "responder" is confusing; it's really a "consumer" of CMS info, but "consumer" is used to refer to the CMS' relationship to Ares? Strange.
Ares config
  : LTIConsumers Table
    : Ares Web URL field designates the page to display (e.g. for different audiences, CMSs. We might want the Ares response page for BlackBoard to look different from LCMS+).
  : LTIFieldMappings
    : Map Ares fields to LTI fields. Limited by values sent from CMS.
CMS config
  : "Launch URL" = http://ares.host.name/ares/webservice/BasicLTI
  : Consumer Key and Secret
  : view all available CMS params with Ares test link = http://ares.host.name/ares/webservice/BasicLTI/ShowLTIParams

Thursday, October 25, 2012

Additional information regarding Open Access


Thank you to all who attended our Open Access panelist event!
 
Special thanks to Dr. Paul Terranova for his introduction of the One University Open Access Publishing Fund.

Looking for more information regarding Open Access and the publishing process? View our Open Access LibGuide (which includes the Open Access PowerPoint Dr. Terranova mentioned this afternoon). Also, view our Copyright and Author Rights LibGuide for more information regarding managing copyright and navigating copyright transfer agreements.

A big thank you to Ken Davis for moderating the event and to our excellent panelists, including Diane Boyle, Liskin Swint-Kruse and Karthik Ramachandran.

Questions about Open Access? Contact Crystal Cameron-Vedros or Rachel Gyore.

Wednesday, October 17, 2012

Dykes Library invites you to participate in Open Access (OA) Week


Dykes Library invites you to celebrate Open Access (OA) Week with us starting next Monday!  The library will host events to promote OA and its benefits for the academic and research community. These events will culminate in an exciting announcement of our new KU One University Open Access Publishing Fund! 

Learn more about the One University Open Access Fund.

Register now for KUMC OA Week events

See all KU Open Access Week events.
Follow #oaweek on Twitter.

What's Open Access? Learn more about OA and author rights.
 
Questions? Contact Crystal Cameron-Vedros or Rachel Gyore.

Tuesday, September 25, 2012

Journals at Dykes Library

Update

A special thank you to University Leadership for working with the Faculty Assembly Information Resources Committee and Dykes Library personnel in making additional funding available to Dykes Library to support collections (journals) for researchers, faculty, clinicians, students. 

Information is not free and continued inflation of the current journal list makes sustaining the status quo untenable.  With the support of University Leadership the cancellations for FY2013 will not be as aggressive as believed in the Spring of 2012. 

With input from your faculty representatives to the Faculty Assembly Information Resources Committee (FAIRC) and Dykes Library personnel, the revised journal cancellation list is now available.  We will again purchase monographs and will discuss with FAIRC criteria by which those funds should be allocated and expended - print or electronic monographs.

During the Fall semester working with University Leadership and FAIRC, it appears that a work group will be formed to develop a plan to address a more reasonable and sustainable method of supporting information and services needs of researchers, faculty, clinicians and students.   Stay tuned.  We will keep the University community updated.   

The updated FAQ identifying how these cancellation decisions were made is here for your review.

Thank you again to the support of FAIRC members and University Leadership.

Friday, September 21, 2012

Upcoming Training: What's New on PubMed?

Dykes Library's NN/LM Biomedical Librarian Rachel Vukas will be presenting about new developments on PubMed Wednesday, September 26 at 2 p.m. CT.

This free, one-hour online training only requires computer access and a phone. Visit this URL: https://webmeeting.nih.gov/mcr2/ then login as a guest with your first and last name. Instructions to connect to the audio will show up once you’ve logged in. Captioning will be provided.


This online training is made available through National Network of Libraries of Medicine MidContinental Region (NN/LM). See more information and learn more about additional NN/LM training opportunities here.  

Thursday, September 13, 2012

New art display at Dykes Library!

Be sure to stop by and enjoy Jean Howard: On Site, a beautiful new art collection on display at Dykes Library’s second floor gallery!

Jean Howard: On Site includes works painted "en plein air" by Howard during her travels around the world. "En plein air" literally translates as "in the open air" and describes works that are created out-of-doors working directly from nature. This sampling of pieces painted in Mexico, Italy, Greece, China, New Mexico, England, France, and Morocco function as a visual travel journal and convey a sense of place and light.

Jean Howard is an accomplished painter and educator. She received a Master of Fine Arts in Painting and Drawing and a Doctorate in Visual Arts Education from the University of Kansas. She taught painting and drawing at Johnson County Community College for more than two decades and holds the title of Professor Emeritus. Her works have been widely exhibited regionally. Many of her former students, now working artists, acknowledge her as a major influence in their careers.

Jean Howard: On Site is available for your viewing pleasure at Dykes Library through November 11.  

 

Monday, September 10, 2012

Henry Stewart Talks has a new look

The Henry Stewart Talks website has been redesigned to make it easier to quickly find relevant audio visual presentations by leading world experts (including Nobel Laureates).  

The website site can be accessed at

As a licensed resource be sure that when you are off campus you have signed on to licensed resources through the proxy server using CAS.

For those of you not familiar, The Biomedical & Life Sciences Collection provides access to over 1,500 talks each specially commissioned from leading world experts. The talks are in the format of slides with synchronized narration and are arranged into comprehensive series. The talks are ideal for independent research and for teaching including distance learning. For advice on how best to use the talks in teaching or for assistance in identifying relevant talks please contact beth@hstalks.com

Tuesday, September 4, 2012

EndNote X6 for Windows is Here!

EndNote is a software application that is used to store and organize the bibliographic information that comprises citations. And, EndNote is designed to house and search the full text of journal articles, including your annotations! With EndNote's integration with Microsoft Word, creating a bibliography becomes a seamless part of the writing process.

Download EndNote X6 for Windows today for free from myKUMC! (And Mac users, look for EndNote X6 this fall!)


 Register for EndNote classes: http://www.trumba.com/calendars/irtraining

Also, check out Dykes Library EndNote Resources: http://library.kumc.edu/resources/EndNote.htm

Wednesday, August 29, 2012

MD Consult Enhancements

The latest version of MD Consult features several enhancements:

  • Select different font sizes to view content. Users can select desired font size (small, medium, large, and largest) from the icons in the upper right corner of MD Consult. The selected font size will persist from page to page, but will reset when the user starts a new session.
  • Modify fonts for Patient Education handouts. To change the font size, be sure to use MD Consult's print features, and not your browser's print option.
  • An option in Patient Handouts to add additional blank space for written instructions when printing the handout. Simply click the checkbox and then hit save before you print.
  • When searching for a drug, the Best Bets result now displays links for different sections of a drug monograph (patient education, indications/dosage, contraindications/precautions, interactions, adverse reactions).
  • QR Codes are displayed on all printed content pages, except patient education handouts and drug monographs. Scanning the code with your mobile device will take you to the URL of the printed material. Again, you must use the MD Consult print feature to print the QR Code.
MD Consult provides instant access to full-text articles from over 80 medical journals and Clinics, 50 leading medical references across a wide range of specialties, clinically relevant drug information, and over 15,000 patient handouts.
Find health-related news from MD Consult, including:


MD Consult is one of many carefully selected clinical reference resources provided by Dykes Library, KUMC, KUPI, and KU Hospital.

Friday, August 10, 2012

Great News!

A special thank you to University Leadership for working with the Faculty Assembly Information Resources Committee and Dykes Library personnel in making additional funding available to Dykes Library to support collections(journals)for researchers, faculty, clinicians and students.

Information is not free and continued inflation of the current journal list makes sustaining the status quo untenable. With the support of University Leadership, the cancellations for FY2013 will not be as aggressive as believed in the Spring of 2012. With input from your faculty representatives to the Faculty Assembly Information Resources Committee (FAIRC) and Dykes Library personnel, there will be a revised journal cancellation list forthcoming. Further, we will be able to again purchase monographs and will discuss with FAIRC criteria by which those funds should be allocated and expended.

During the Fall semester, working with University Leadership and FAIRC, it appears that a work group will be formed to develop a plan to address a more reasonable and sustainable method of supporting the information and services needs of researchers, faculty, clinicians and students. Stay tuned. We will keep the University community updated.

In the next 30 – 45 days we will prepare a revised list of cancellations and an updated FAQ identifying the "how" these cancellation decisions were made. That FAQ will be made available on the Dykes website.

Thank you again to the support of FAIRC members and University Leadership.

Thursday, August 9, 2012

UCSF faculty approve open access policy

UCSF IMPLEMENTS POLICY TO MAKE RESEARCH PAPERS FREELY ACCESSIBLE TO PUBLIC Health Sciences Campus Becomes Largest in Nation to Adopt Open-access Policy The UCSF Academic Senate has voted to make electronic versions of current and future scientific articles freely available to the public, helping to reverse decades of practice on the part of medical and scientific journal publishers to restrict access to research results. The unanimous vote of the faculty senate makes UCSF the largest scientific institution in the nation to adopt an open-access policy and among the first public universities to do so. “Our primary motivation is to make our research available to anyone who is interested in it, whether they are members of the general public or scientists without costly subscriptions to journals,” said Richard A. Schneider, PhD, chair of the UCSF Academic Senate Committee on Library and Scholarly Communication, who spearheaded the initiative at UCSF. “The decision is a huge step forward in eliminating barriers to scientific research,” he said. “By opening the currently closed system, this policy will fuel innovation and discovery, and give the taxpaying public free access to oversee their investments in research.” UCSF is the nation’s largest public recipient of funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), receiving 1,056 grants last year, valued at $532.8 million. Research from those and other grants leads to more than 4,500 scientific papers each year in highly regarded, peer-reviewed scientific journals, but the majority of those papers are only available to subscribers who pay ever-increasing fees to the journals. The 10-campus University of California (UC) system spends close to $40 million each year to buy access to journals. Such restrictions and costs have been cited among the obstacles in translating scientific advances from laboratory research into improved clinical care. The new policy requires UCSF faculty to make each of their articles freely available immediately through an open-access repository, and thus accessible to the public through search engines such as Google Scholar. Articles will be deposited in a UC repository, other national open-access repositories such as the NIH-sponsored PubMed Central, or published as open-access publications. They will then be available to be read, downloaded, mined, or distributed without barriers. Schneider said hurdles do remain, including convincing commercial publishers to modify their exclusive publication contracts to accommodate such a policy. Some publishers already have demonstrated their willingness to do so, he said, but others, especially premier journals, have been less inclined to allow the system to change. Under terms negotiated with the NIH, a major proponent of open access, some of the premier journals only allow open access in PubMed Central one year after publication; prior to that only the titles and summaries of articles are freely available. How such journals will handle the UCSF policy remains to be seen, Schneider said. The UCSF policy gives the university a nonexclusive license to distribute any peer-reviewed articles that will also be published in scientific or medical journals. Researchers are able to “opt out” if they want to publish in a certain journal but find that the publisher is unwilling to comply with the UCSF policy. “The hope,” said Schneider, “is that faculty will think twice about where they publish, and choose to publish in journals that support the goals of the policy.” Worldwide Open Access Movement UC was at the forefront of the movement to open scientific papers to the public through its libraries, and generated the first major effort to create a policy of this kind in 2006. It was a complex policy, though, requiring faculty to “opt in,” and for a variety of reasons failed to garner enough faculty votes across the UC system, said Schneider. But since then, he said, the academic and economic climate has changed substantially in favor of the open access movement. In the past few years, 141 universities worldwide, including Harvard University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, have learned from UC’s initial missteps and have created very effective blanket policies similar to the one just passed at UCSF, Schneider said. Universities throughout Europe and Latin America also have pursued similar policies. Moreover, many funders have adopted open access policies for their grant recipients as a requirement for getting a research award, so faculty are now used to the practice of making their work freely available. Last year, scientific, technical, and medical journals generated billions of dollars in profits for their publishers, and, for the largest publishers, profit margins were around 30 percent to 40 percent Schneider said. Yet, research papers are largely funded by taxpayers, submitted to the journals without compensation, and edited and reviewed on a volunteer basis by colleagues throughout the world. Due to the high fees incurred in subscribing to such journals, many universities and the general public have access only to an abstract on each paper, which includes a short description of the research and its results. The UCSF vote was the result of a faculty-led initiative and makes UCSF the first campus in the UC system to implement such a policy. It has been developed in collaboration with other UC campuses and systemwide committees, especially the UC Committee on Library and Scholarly Communication, with the ultimate goal of implementing the policy across all ten UC campuses. “This vote is very, very good news,” said Karen Butter, UCSF librarian and assistant vice chancellor. “I am delighted that UCSF will join leading institutions in changing the model of scientific communications, and that UCSF authors have chosen to take control of their scholarship, providing new audiences with incredible opportunities to translate UCSF’s remarkable research into improving health care.” The University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) is a leading university dedicated to promoting health worldwide through advanced biomedical research, graduate-level education in the life sciences and health professions, and excellence in patient care.

Center for Practical Bioethics Virtual Town Hall Meeting

The US Supreme Court has ruled and now we must determine what’s next for America’s healthcare system. This month the Center for Practical Bioethics will conduct a Virtual Town Hall Meeting on The Future of Health Reform. There are two purposes for this virtual meeting: to inform all of us about the nature of this change, and to engage in a conversation about what this means to you. Each week of August the Center will share information and commentary from a broad range of individuals with a keen interest in how this process unfolds. At the same time, you will be given an opportunity to provide input and respond to what the experts say. So join us in this Virtual Town Hall Meeting. Click here to view this week's video conversation with Art Caplan, PhD, and to participate in the weekly poll on health reform.

Monday, August 6, 2012

Have a question? Need help? Ask a Librarian!

Chat with a librarian in real time weekdays from 11:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. Simply type your question in the chat box and a librarian will be with you shortly. It's that easy!

Already using IM? Add dykeslibrarian to your buddy list in AIM, Google, Windows Live, or Yahoo.

Try it out today!

Thursday, July 26, 2012

Microsoft Outlook is Coming! Are You Ready?

Did you know KUMC is switching to Microsoft Outlook this fall? Prepare now to ensure a smooth transition later!


Questions? Contact Byron Johns at bjohns@kumc.edu 

Also, check out our Information Resources Training calendar for additional classes held here at Dykes Library and available to all KUMC patrons!

Wednesday, July 18, 2012

Did you know we deliver articles straight to you?


That's right! As a service to you, we obtain material from libraries worldwide. If the item you want is unavailable in the Dykes Library collection, we'll find it for you.

Using the ILLiad electronic system, students, staff, faculty and any registered patron can obtain materials that support scholarly research. Articles are typically delivered online to your ILLiad account within just two business days.

Regular delivery requests for KUMC faculty, staff and students are either $3.00 or free! Please see our fee chart for additional information.

You can also place an order for a book, book chapter, conference paper or thesis. Take a look at ILLiad today!

video


Questions? Contact our Resource Sharing & Management staff at 913-588-5073 weekdays from 8 a.m.-5p.m. or email dykesils@kumc.edu.

Tuesday, July 10, 2012

GoPrint temorarily unavailable Wednesday, July 11th.

We are updating our GoPrint system Wednesday, July 11th beginning at 10 a.m.

Printing to GoPrint will not be available during the upgrade period. The upgrade will likely take a few hours.

Thank you for your patience as we upgrade our server software and make other necessary updates!

Monday, July 9, 2012

We Invite You to Meet Our Experts.


Like the rest of the Medical Center, we librarians are proud of our researchers! We are so proud, in fact, that we created and continue to maintain an awesome tool called Meet Our Experts that features expertise and the range of scholarship across disciplines at The University of Kansas Medical Center.

Meet Our Experts currently features approximately 17,100 works  from about 1100 KUMC researchers from both the Kansas City and Wichita campuses. It is maintained by 15 librarians and staff at Dykes Library. 

For more information about Meet Our Experts and how it works, visit our FAQ page.

Join us at Dykes Library in celebrating the researchers and clinical experts at The University of Kansas Medical Center!

Tuesday, July 3, 2012

Library Hours for Independence Day Holiday

In observance of Independence Day, the library will be closed on Wednesday, July 4th.

We will reopen Thursday, July 5th, at 7:30 a.m.

Have a fun and safe holiday!

Friday, June 29, 2012

Open Access and Why It Matters.

Calling all researchers, students and faculty--want to know more about open access and why it matters? Watch the video below and check out our compilation of resources on our Open Access LibGuide.

Questions about open access? Contact Crystal Cameron-Vedros, Copyright and Scholarly Communications Librarian, at cvedros@kumc.edu or by phone at 913-588-7916.

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Open Access Journal PeerJ Launches

PeerJ, an new Open Access Journal, launched June 12. Here is a Publishers Weekly article containing an interview with cofounder Peter Binfield, formerly with PLoS1. PeerJ will operate on a basic lifetime author fee of $99 for article publishing with expanded publishing options available.

Henry Stewart Talks - June updates

Henry Stewart Talks June updates include additions to the following series: Macrophage Heterogeneity and Function; Cells of the Innate Immune System: Roles in health and disease; Calcium Signaling: regulation, mechanisms, effectors, role in disease and recent advances; Neurotrauma; basic research, clinical care and patients' perspectives; Introduction to Human Genetics: fundamentals and latest advances.

Thursday, June 7, 2012

Identifying Open Access Predatory Publishers

Here is a Chronicle of Higher Education interview with Jeffrey Beall, who blogs about predatory publishers that he self-identifies. In the interview, he points out some of the characteristics that stand out as bogus when certain publishers claim to be Open Access.

Thursday, May 31, 2012

Access2Research

Here is an article from The Chronicle of Higher Education about the Acces2Research petition circulating from the White House's We the People public petition website. The petition is close to getting its required 25,000 signatures. When the number is received, the petition will go to the White House Chief of Staff for a response. The petition asks President Obama to mandate that eleven other federal agencies make their federally funded research results freely available to the public, similar to the NIH mandate that places its funded research resulting in scholarly, peer reviewed articles into PubMed Central.


RUK (Reed Elsevier): The Maturing Threat of Open Access

As University Libraries continue to reduce their journal acquisitions due to mandated library resources funding reductions, commercial publishers will face losing their primary customer base, and thus, their profit margins. This article features Elsevier publishing. University libraries are exploring the growing Open Access model as an alternative to license and subscription-based journal purchasing.

Wednesday, May 30, 2012

Translational Research Symposium

The Kansas City Area Life Sciences Institute is hosting its 2012 Research Symposium on Thursday, May 31: The Power of Collaboration in Translational Research. Please go here for more information.
Additionally, there is an article in The KC Star which gives a nice explanation of what Translational Research is written by an VP at the Kauffman Foundation.

Friday, May 25, 2012

Academic Senate at UCSF voted for OA

UCSF IMPLEMENTS POLICY TO MAKE RESEARCH PAPERS FREELY ACCESSIBLE TO PUBLIC

Health Sciences Campus Becomes Largest in Nation to Adopt Open-access Policy

The UCSF Academic Senate has voted to make electronic versions of current and future scientific articles freely available to the public, helping to reverse decades of practice on the part of medical and scientific journal publishers to restrict access to research results.

The unanimous vote of the faculty senate makes UCSF the largest scientific institution in the nation to adopt an open-access policy and among the first public universities to do so.

“Our primary motivation is to make our research available to anyone who is interested in it, whether they are members of the general public or scientists without costly subscriptions to journals,” said Richard A. Schneider, PhD, chair of the UCSF Academic Senate Committee on Library and Scholarly Communication, who spearheaded the initiative at UCSF. “The decision is a huge step forward in eliminating barriers to scientific research,” he said. “By opening the currently closed system, this policy will fuel innovation and discovery, and give the taxpaying public free access to oversee their investments in research.”

UCSF is the nation’s largest public recipient of funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), receiving 1,056 grants last year, valued at $532.8 million. Research from those and other grants leads to more than 4,500 scientific papers each year in highly regarded, peer-reviewed scientific journals, but the majority of those papers are only available to subscribers who pay ever-increasing fees to the journals. The 10-campus University of California (UC) system spends close to $40 million each year to buy access to journals.

Such restrictions and costs have been cited among the obstacles in translating scientific advances from laboratory research into improved clinical care.

The new policy requires UCSF faculty to make each of their articles freely available immediately through an open-access repository, and thus accessible to the public through search engines such as Google Scholar. Articles will be deposited in a UC repository, other national open-access repositories such as the NIH-sponsored PubMed Central, or published as open-access publications. They will then be available to be read, downloaded, mined, or distributed without barriers.

Schneider said hurdles do remain, including convincing commercial publishers to modify their exclusive publication contracts to accommodate such a policy. Some publishers already have demonstrated their willingness to do so, he said, but others, especially premier journals, have been less inclined to allow the system to change.

Under terms negotiated with the NIH, a major proponent of open access, some of the premier journals only allow open access in PubMed Central one year after publication; prior to that only the titles and summaries of articles are freely available. How such journals will handle the UCSF policy remains to be seen, Schneider said.

The UCSF policy gives the university a nonexclusive license to distribute any peer-reviewed articles that will also be published in scientific or medical journals. Researchers are able to “opt out” if they want to publish in a certain journal but find that the publisher is unwilling to comply with the UCSF policy. “The hope,” said Schneider, “is that faculty will think twice about where they publish, and choose to publish in journals that support the goals of the policy.”

Worldwide Open Access Movement

UC was at the forefront of the movement to open scientific papers to the public through its libraries, and generated the first major effort to create a policy of this kind in 2006. It was a complex policy, though, requiring faculty to “opt in,” and for a variety of reasons failed to garner enough faculty votes across the UC system, said Schneider. But since then, he said, the academic and economic climate has changed substantially in favor of the open access movement.

In the past few years, 141 universities worldwide, including Harvard University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, have learned from UC’s initial missteps and have created very effective blanket policies similar to the one just passed at UCSF, Schneider said. Universities throughout Europe and Latin America also have pursued similar policies. Moreover, many funders have adopted open access policies for their grant recipients as a requirement for getting a research award, so faculty are now used to the practice of making their work freely available.

Last year, scientific, technical, and medical journals generated billions of dollars in profits for their publishers, and, for the largest publishers, profit margins were around 30 percent to 40 percent Schneider said. Yet, research papers are largely funded by taxpayers, submitted to the journals without compensation, and edited and reviewed on a volunteer basis by colleagues throughout the world. Due to the high fees incurred in subscribing to such journals, many universities and the general public have access only to an abstract on each paper, which includes a short description of the research and its results.

The UCSF vote was the result of a faculty-led initiative and makes UCSF the first campus in the UC system to implement such a policy. It has been developed in collaboration with other UC campuses and systemwide committees, especially the UC Committee on Library and Scholarly Communication, with the ultimate goal of implementing the policy across all ten UC campuses.

“This vote is very, very good news,” said Karen Butter, UCSF librarian and assistant vice chancellor. “I am delighted that UCSF will join leading institutions in changing the model of scientific communications, and that UCSF authors have chosen to take control of their scholarship, providing new audiences with incredible opportunities to translate UCSF’s remarkable research into improving health care.”

The University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) is a leading university dedicated to promoting health worldwide through advanced biomedical research, graduate-level education in the life sciences and health professions, and excellence in patient care.

Wednesday, May 23, 2012

New Health Information Literacy Tool Available at Dykes Library

Dykes Library has been awarded a 1-year license for software called Health Literacy Advisor from Health Literacy Innovations, Inc. The MidContinental Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine awarded licenses to regional libraries. Described on the HLA website "[a]s a health literacy checker, the HLA streamlines the review and simplification process by allowing users to assess the health of their documents and then fix it using plain language principles."

Documents can be reviewed for readability level and the results stamped in the footer. The software will scan the document and highlight words that compromise the readability. It will then make recommendations for improvement.

The Health Literacy Advisor program will run for 1 year from the end of April 2012 through the end of April 2013. This project has been funded in whole or in part with Federal funds from the Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, National Library of Medicine, under Contract No. HHS-N-276-2011-00006-C with the University of Utah Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library.

For more information about how to access the software, contact Amy Ritterskamp at Dykes Library at 588-7168 or aritterskamp@kumc.edu

Monday, May 21, 2012

Experts.kumc.edu down for maintenance

Meet Our Experts, http://experts.kumc.edu, may be down periodically today for scheduled maintenance. We will try to minimize downtime and we apologize for any inconvenience.

Monday, May 14, 2012

Copyright - E-Reserves and Georgia State Univ legal case

Georgia State University was sued by publishers alleging copyright infringement on the use of material for E-Reserves. Duke University’s first Scholarly Communications Officer, Kevin Smith, JD, offers his review of this lawsuit. http://blogs.library.duke.edu/scholcomm/2012/05/12/the-gsu-decision-not-an-easy-road-for-anyone/ Also reported on by Inside Higher Ed

Friday, May 11, 2012

Henry Stewart Talks - May updates

Another new series has been added, Macrophage Heterogeneity and Function as well as a number of new talks in existing series such as Cells of the Innate Immune System Series and Good Laboratory Practice Series.

Wednesday, May 9, 2012

Library hours

Please be aware that after Friday, May 11th, the library's hours will be modified for 2 weeks due to the break time between spring and summer semesters.  Hours will be the following:
  • Closed Saturdays and Sundays until June
  • 8am - 5pm Monday through Friday
  • Memorial Day, May 28th:  open 6pm - 11pm
Regular hours will resume Tuesday, May 29th.

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

Students, looking for a part-time job?

The library is currently hiring for a part-time Student Assistant. You must maintain a minimum of 6 credit hours per semester to qualify. The schedule consists 10-15 hours each week, between 8:00 am-5:00 pm, Monday thru Friday.

Duties:

1.    Use citations to locate and retrieve journals/books in the library’s physical collection 
2.    Scan/photocopy/attach and send articles to other libraries or individuals via electronic transmission.
3.    Package books for delivery via UPS or courier
4.    Work on special projects and other duties as assigned

If interested, please apply in person at the front desk, or email the hiring manager at rsm@kumc.edu for the application packet.

Tuesday, April 10, 2012

Science is getting: easier, harder, both, neither?

Dr. Jonathan D. Moreno, Professor of Medical Ethics and Health Policy, of History and Sociology of Science, and of Philosophy at the University of Pennsylvania, has posted an interesting essay on the Huffington Post, titled, "Check This Box: Science Is Getting Easier/Harder/Both/Neither?" Dr. Moreno asserts, "...science is asking more precise questions but the answers are harder to get." He also writes, "In a way, we've already plucked much of the low-hanging fruit. Though it took tens of thousands of years to get on track, once we got there we learned fast. How low-hanging the fruit of new knowledge is depends in part on how we approach it. We seem to be in a transition period from a marvelously rich era of discovery in the last thirty years to an era in which new concepts and methods will be required to gain access to another range of powerful discoveries." http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jonathan-d-moreno/check-this-box-science-is_b_1408938.html?ref=science

IPE - Competency based learning

The AAMC, as a partner in the Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC), has announced a call for submissions for competency-based learning and assessment resources, in support of the IPEC Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative Practice report. Funded in part by the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation, this initiative is designed to create a national clearinghouse of competency-linked learning resources for interprofessional education and models of team-based or collaborative care. The AAMC, with guidance from the IPEC-MedEdPORTAL Advisory Committee, will select up to fifteen (15) applicants for resource development awards of $2,000 to accelerate content refinement in preparation for formal submission and peer-review to MedEdPORTAL. The award application deadline is Friday, May 25, 2012 at 5p (EDT) with applicants notified of funding decisions by June 18, 2012. http://www.mededportal.org/ipe

Saturday, March 24, 2012

Internet outage Sunday, March 25

Please note that we will be without Internet access this Sunday, March 25th, from 1-1:30 p.m while faulty equipment is replaced.

Visit the front desk if you need to print and/or make room reservations as these services will also be affected by the Internet outage.

Thanks for your patience!

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Reserve your own study rooms!

KUMC students, faculty, and staff:

Dykes Library has debuted a new online reservation system for study rooms called Book It! Find the Book It! icon on the homepage, log-in using your username and password, and reserve a study room* without the assistance of front desk staff. Study rooms will also be self-service - doors will remain unlocked and staff will not be checking out keys anymore! If a room is empty, you may "walk in" to use it and reserve it on the spot until the next student who has reserved it (if any) shows up.

Please feel free to send comments to dykesref@kumc.edu or stop by the front desk to let us know how the system works for you.

Book It!


*Regular study room policies apply

Thursday, March 8, 2012

Predatory/Vanity Publishers

Just because a publisher claims to be open access and follows the author pays fees OA Model, not all publishers are on the up-and-up. Have you been solicited to publish in a particular journal? Are you skeptical? How can you be sure the journal is reputable?
Features to look for and verify:
  • Are there typos or grammatical errors? That's usually a flag.
  • Did you check the databases in which the journal claims to appear and find them? If you didn't find them, that's a flag. Example: the journal title claims to be indexed in PubMed but you can't find the journal title in PubMed. Not good.
  • Did you find any journal issues in the archive? In the current journal list? If you can't find back issues or if there are only a couple of back issues or maybe just an image of a journal flyer, that's a flag.
  • What is the pricing structure? How many journal articles will be accepted during the membership time frame? Is the pricing information clear? Is there a mechanism in place in which you agree or not agree to pay? Be careful.
  • Are you prompted to check with your Institution to find out if there is an Institution-paid membership on your behalf? If not, be careful.
  • What do you get for the price? Beware of publishers who offer you a certificate of membership suitable for framing and/or a designated title to add to your signature. Example: Publisher boasts that membership includes certificate suitable for framing and permission to add their group member designation behind your signature: I. M. Smart, MD, Member, Association of Predatory Publishers (MAPP)
  • A publisher may claim to provide peer review and to list an impressive editorial board. Contact the listed board members to verify.
Be skeptical when you are solicited to publish anywhere. If you find any of the above flags, or others, beware and seek assistance from your librarian liaison.
Crystal Cameron-Vedros, cvedros@kumc.edu

Wednesday, March 7, 2012

New Features in Archie, January 3, 2012 Release

On January 3, we upgraded Archie to the latest DSpace software release, version 1.8.1. This release includes new features and bug fixes.  We've also added some customizations requested by KUMC faculty.
Some of the more noticeable changes include:

  • Export item and collection metadata that conforms to NLM Journal Submission format. See an example of a Kansas Journal of Medicine article at http://archie.kumc.edu/metadata/handle/2271/893/nlm.xml. Find more information about submitting ejournals to PubMed at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/services/ejournals.html
  • RSS feeds now support iTunes podcast and publishing to iTunesU.
  • Create or edit metadata in batches.
  • Customize submission workflows.
  • Execute routine "curation tasks" across collections.
  • Improved Creative Commons licensing support.
  • Use controlled vocabularies when submitting items.
Learn more about Archie, KUMC's institutional repository services for digital content.
DSpace is institutional repository software widely used by institutions around the world.

Henry Stewart Talks - new series added

Biomedical & Life Sciences Collection January 2012 updates include a new series Good Laboratory Practice: Principles, Compliance and Mutual Recognition. www.hstalks.com/r/tblsc/recent

Tuesday, March 6, 2012

EMR reduce costs - maybe not

Health Affairs reports, "Despite the widely held assumption that having computer access to patients' test results will reduce testing, a new study shows that doctors who have such access to tests in the ambulatory care setting are more likely to order imaging and lab tests. Researchers writing in the March issue of the journal Health Affairs say their findings challenge one premise of the nation's multibillion-dollar effort to promote widespread adoption of health information technology (HIT). They warn that the effort 'may not yield anticipated cost savings from reductions in duplicative or inappropriate diagnostic testing' and, in fact, could drive costs up."
http://content.healthaffairs.org/content/31/3/488.abstract

Academic Medicine iPad application

Academic Medicine is now available for the iPad. The journal has released a new app for iPad, available now through the App Store. The app offers a print-like reading experience of each issue, with easy-to-read, full-text articles; adjustable text sizing with “pinch and zoom;” access to tables, figures, and supplemental content; ability to store or delete downloaded issues; and convenient notification when a new issue is available. The March issue, released last week, is free to download for non-subscribers.
http://journals.lww.com/academicmedicine/Pages/iPad-App.aspx

Monday, March 5, 2012

Access to USMLE-Easy has changed

Trying to access USMLE-Easy via AccessMedicine? Update your bookmarks because USMLE-Easy is no longer available via the AccessMedicine database; it is now accessible at its own website; click here for access. If you haven't set up a personal account yet you may do that on the homepage; if you're a returning user, enter your previous username and password for access to the tests and your personal progress reports. If you have trouble accessing USMLE Easy, please contact Bob Pisciotta at bpisciotta@kumc.edu for assistance.

Friday, March 2, 2012

Patient-centered medical home

A new systematic review of evidence conducted by Mathematica Policy Research in collaboration with the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and published in the American Journal of Managed Care "reveals that the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model has the potential to improve quality of care, hospital care, and patient experience within the healthcare system." According to Mathematica, "The review was conducted to help inform healthcare reform policy and program efforts across the nation and to offer guidance in how to better structure future evaluations."
http://tinyurl.com/8xlp5zl

Thursday, March 1, 2012

Students, looking for a part-time job?

The library is currently hiring for a part-time Student Assistant. You must maintain a minimum of 6 credit hours per semester to qualify. Work schedule is 8-12 hours each week, between the hours of 8:00 am and 5:00 pm, Monday through Friday.

Duties:

1. Use citations to locate and retrieve journals/books in the library’s physical collection

2. Scan/photocopy/attach and send articles to other libraries or individuals via electronic transmission.

3. Package books for delivery via UPS or courier

4. Work on special projects and other duties as assigned


If interested, please apply in person at the front desk, or email the hiring manager at rsm@kumc.edu for the application packet.

Thank you!

Tuesday, February 21, 2012

Standards and Operational Guidance for Ethics Review of Health-Related Research with Human Participants

Our colleagues at AAHRPP recently brought to our attention a new World Health Organization publication, “Standards and Operational Guidance for Ethics Review of Health-Related Research with Human Participants.” This document "has been developed for individuals and organizations involved in health-related research with human participants, including biomedical, behavioural, social science, and epidemiological research...In particular, this document is intended to provide guidance to the research ethics committees (RECs) on which organizations rely to review and oversee the ethical aspects of research, as well as to the researchers who design and carry out health research studies."
http://www.who.int/ethics/publications/en/

Monday, February 13, 2012

Notes from Code4Lib 2012

Some rough notes from Code4Lib 2012 Conference in Seattle. I'll link to the videos archives as time allows.


Monday, February, 6. Preconference Workshops.
Linked Data - Dan Chudnov
Corey Harper: http://www.tagasauris.com/ does Crowdsourcing social network sites to tag photos. But how do you map "canonical" descriptions/metadata to that data…approaching "aboutness". Then geo-tag. Recruiting others (turk it) to use Google Refine to map the data.
Devon Smith (OCLC): Moving beyond MARC. Decoupling MARC and remodeling into Linked Data. Beginning to explore the model, which vocabularies, FRBR relationships.
Dan Chudnov: Socially networked repo for linked data.
Brainstormed on DChud's idea.

Blacklight
4:05
You can see it on the cliobeta side bar.
4:05
It really took like 10 minutes at best to add it in.
4:13
4:15
4:16

Installed Blacklight on my Mac and imported a tiny set of MARC records from Voyager.

Tuesday, February 7, 2012. Keynote.
Dan Chudnov, GWU
"ketone" :)
"I love you, but we blew it! We have turned away too many people."
Retraced his family and personal history noting that "things fall apart." Retraced history and current state of Code4Lib, warning that "if we don't change, this thing will fall out from under us". People will stop trying to get in next year to attend the conference if we don't make room for them.
Non-techies want to learn to do what we do.
We must "Hack or Die"!
PyCon is a good model. 2 days of pre-conf training at all levels. Post-conf sprint days.
"Chicago's ready, are you?"

Tuesday, February 7, 2012. Session 1.
Git and Mercurial
Using version control on metadata
Mentioned in IRC: richard anderson at Stanford recently release a comparison of version control systems for "repository objects"
Case 2: Zephir metadata management system for HathiTrust. "Individually, this has been a fantastic decision." Everything works great, but when you're dealing with 10mill files, it's wicked slow.
If it looks like code, even if it's data, it will probably work.

Linked-Data-Ready Software for Libraries, eXtensible Catalog
Setting stage for linked data: converting MARC data to FRBR, designed schema for mapping to triples, developed platform to create linked data.
Bulk conversion of existing metadata, sync data conversion to existing systems, allow libraries to do it themselves, provide a way to experiment with data, make linked data available to developers (find out what libraries need, what developers want)
NCIP toolkit has a Voyager driver? Should we use this with VuFind and also to provide linked data.
Future plans for tools: vocabularies, expert enrichment of metadata
Scholarly Practice Participatory Program

Your catalog in Linked Data. Document at achelo.us/talks/marc2rdf
"Just take some baby steps". 
Perl script to convert macro to RDF triples, host a working SPARQL endpoint, and publish linked dataset to endpoint

HTML5 Microdata and Schema.org
HTML5 Semantics, but still don't tell us anything about our content. That's where HTML5 Microdata comes in.
Google found that RDFA was too complex for page editors, thus HTML5 Microdata.
Itemscope, Itemtype, Itemprop makes up entire schema. Everything is an item of type ItemType that has properties ItemProp.
Schema.org hosts schemas for ItemTypes
Catches: Only certain types trigger Google rich snippets, missing Types for many Objects, sparse properties for types.
Communities are just beginning to develop around defining ItemTypes, e.g. Marvel proposing Comics and Periodical Schemas.
Call to action: Try it out, report back to community

ALL TEH METADATAS! Declan Fleming
How we used RDF to manage digital assets. 
You can't simply make up the triples -> METS as container model. MODS for descriptive metadata, PREMIS/MIX/XDRE for Admin/Rights/Technical metadata, METS for structural metadata, file locations map to storage
DAMS metadata workflow (also starting to use for research data, 5 pilot data collections)
Why RDF? Flexible. Easy to change our minds if we want. Triples expressed in any form given the proper stylesheet. Serialize RDF back to XML and onto disk.

HathiTrust Large Scale Search
Performance: phrase queries too slow. Solution: CommonGrams
For large-scale search, favor precision over recall
Reading positions index is performance hit
[Look at slides again later and read blog posts]

Relevance Ranking in the Scholarly Domain, Ex Libris on Primo
Being methodical
Evaluation Metrics: MAP, MRR

Kill the Search Button 2, Michael Nielsen
The Handheld Devices Are Coming
"No child in the pipeline"
Gestures for a mobile search app
Hands are a really good tool, but unfortunately current paradigm is based on glass => "we slide"
Devices don't provide clues or feedback for gestures
Alternative = Direct manipulation, gesture-driven, palpable, tactile, feedback
Mobile projects at State University in Denmark: mobile search apps: HTML5 app for searching.
App for barcode scanning to location mapping.
Large number of possible interactions with smartphones
Chose to go native and build iPhone app. Wait for better support for HTML5
Cool! Checkout demo video
There are no standard mobile gestures. They may be individual or may not be appropriate or all.

Design for Developers, Lisa Kurt, U of Nevada
Basics of graphic design
It's difficult for people to identify why they like something. Vocabulary: color, composition, typeface
Study the designs that you love and those that you hate.
Why do we care? Maintain credibility with your audience. "You don't wanna have a rainbow s*!#storm, basically." [best quote of the conference]
"Don't use clip art that looks like clip art."
Alignment, space, pleasing art, balance, restraint.
Design a little and then walk away.

The Golden Road, U of Santa Cruz
Grateful Dead Archive Online
Using Omeka
User contributions through Omeka, Archive data through ContentDM
Also using ARK identifiers from EZID.
[Collaborate with Scott on Omeka/Hydra. Slides?]
Passing METS record from Omeka to Merritt (digital object storage http://merritt.cdlib.org/). Possibly also use Fedora for backend storage.
All metadata and objects directly into ContentDM. Problems interacting with ContentDM. Resorted to running batch scripts against Web Admin client.
METS/MODS from ContentDM

Hydra Breakout
some people exploring replacing Fedora with Microservices underneath
Hydra adds access control and gated discovery. Each head provides customized functionality to solve a specific need
Blacklight is read-only discovery
at least 15 institutions actively creating Hydra heads and using Hydra
Notre Dame's Atrium project is designed to be used as just a Blacklight extension or with the full Hydra stack for collections mgmt.
IRC channel #projecthydra
Head for curating dataset is at top of priorities, but real-world solutions have fizzled.

Breakout reports
Building OSS communities. Building a Library a la Carte community. U of Oregon maintaining. Testing an Amazon cloud deployment. FOSS4Lib bringing together libraries and programmers for pitching and developing ideas.
Schema.org and Microdata. Interest in use for citation data, datasets.

Tuesday, February 7, 2012. Lightning Talks.

  1. XTF. 
  2. Save MLAK. Code4LibJapan. 
  3. Created wiki for sharing information - actually worked well. Tshirts and bags for donations.
  4. Vendors Suck. Andrew Nagy, Serials Solutions. Not really. Your library's problems aren't unique. Call your vendor and ask to talk with the project manager.
  5. Heat Maps, not just for input analysis. Let's get grad students to teach instruction sessions. Identifying times of greatest need because grad students have limited time and have to travel.
  6. ElasticSearch. Gabriel Farrell. All JSON. Clustering and sharding out of the box. All interaction is with http and JSON. JSON-based document store. 
  7. NISO wants to hear about your problems. What environment or conditions are needed for addressing problems for interoperability? Several working groups available.
  8. Finding Images in Book Page Images. PicturePages, Eric Larson. Grabbing book page images with curl, run thru ImageMagick with some crazy processing.
  9. Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Library and Archive using Blacklight against EAD/MARC.
  10. Finding Movies with FRBR and Facets. Making it easier to find movies in libraries. People want to find movies, but libraries describe *publications*. Users don't care about a lot of the stuff we do, but they do care about versions (Blu-Ray, DVD, language). FRBRized records. only one hit per movie title, with multiple versions listed under it.
  11. Web usability using terms. Boyhun Kim, UW Medical Library. Don't over-rely on context: "Images" -> "Medical Images". Terms like "mobile" can be interpreted very broadly by users: "mobile" = "off-campus access as well as mobile app". Sometimes there is no better term: "Interlibrary Loan". Brevity will cost you. [See slides]
  12. Restriction Classes, B!#@hes. Simon Spero. OWL learning time. Commonly misunderstood aspect of OWL. Attempto-controlled English
  13. Processing.js. Make visualizations, graphics work using web standards and without plugins. Other uses: learning Japanese
Get LAMP 9:00PM in Ballroom

Wednesday, February 8, 2012. Morning Session 1. 
Digital Library User Behavior with Google Analytics, Kirk Hess, U of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Can export data using API. [Could use to map collection handles to community handles]
Some British guy adds comment about calling Analytics events from your server. Interesting. I'll have to follow up on that.

Single Search Box, Corey Lown
73% of searches start from default tab. Other tabs are ignored - even though they used the other tabs during usability testing. Yup!
Worth watching again later with staff
"We pay a lot of attention to top search terms…. If we can get these searches working really well, we'll probably make a lot of people happy."
Single search box implies that you're confident it will work really well…hmmm
Tracking stats using a redirect script from search box

Building research applications with Mendeley, William Gunn
"Mendeley collection attention data about papers."
JISC DURA Project jisc-dura.blogspot.com. Researchers can use Mendeley desktop to dump their publications into a repository box.
This presentation could have been much better. Kind of hard to make sense of.
Give feedback on presentation
http://mnd.ly/c4l2012wg  Belgian

Wednesday, February 8, 2012. Morning Session 2.
Stack View, http://github.com/harvard-lil/stackview
Recreating records into pixels…size, height, thickness.
Heatmapping…coloring book renderings based on data: popularity, Amazon rating, whatever datapoint you want
Renderings are just HTML+CSS
Can use various APIs to get book data (catalog, Amazon, whatever)
Push out Stack View JSON and consume
Github version is only books. Harvard's production version will have other representations.

Bib framework for digital age, Jeremy Nelson, Colorado College
LoC working group 
NoSQL & Redis for bib records
BigTable and Hadoop
Redis key-value data structures are descriptive enough to model bib records using FRBR
[check out Twitter's Bootstrap for web and presentation design framework, and other stuff listed at the end]
[Watch this again later]
875,xxx+ records in Redis

Ask Anything
Dan Chudnov looking for someone to help with Rails on Umlaut
Data management plan support (related to Research Works Act) -- Declan's DMP pilot project at UC

Wednesday, February 8, 2012. Afternoon Session
Data Storage in the Browser. Jason Casden [Rewatch his browser data storage}

Lies, Damned Lies, and Lines of Code Per Day, Columbia University
Read "Making Software Work" book
How do you hire the right people? 
[Maybe watch this again]

Agile at Stanford, Naomi Dushay
Sheets on Taskboard photo: Backlog, On Deck, In Progress, Done
One week a month is Dead Week = no standing meetings

Research Networks and Citation Analysis Breakout [Me]

  • BibApp, VIVO, Zotero, Mendeley, vendor products
  • Potential role in promotion and tenure? Providing services to departments, e.g. CV creation.
  • Different needs for different types of institutions and disciplines. Humanities may actually need a wider network than biomedical, science.
  • Role in open access publishing
  • Role as discovery interface for multiple content and repository types. Richer relationship graphs than most repository software.
  • Take advantage of Zotero, Mendeley, crowdsourcing, and linked data. Tom (U. of Oregon) brought up AltMetrics and possibility of relating works better to existing ontologies.

Wednesday, February 8, 2012. Lightning Talks

  1. Zotero & SHERPA/RoMEO. Scott H. Filter a collection of articles by publisher policies. Zotero Plugin?
  2. Including library resources in LMS. Basic LTI. Passing query through http post with parameters about it's LMS context (course details) to some library application.
  3. FOSS4Lib, Peter Murray, Lyrasis
  4. I've Got Good News, Mark Matienzo. fiwalk progress for extracting archival metadata from digital media.
  5. ArchivesOnline at Indiana. Digitization workflow.
  6. Mashing up OPACs in Japan. Screen scraped *all* OPACs in Japan. Built web service for all 5000 libraries, 2000 OPACs.
  7. Make broadcast TV, radio available online, Denmark. Built repository, search, services
  8. Macaw. Joel, Smithsonian. Metadata collection tool for book-like things. On Google Code (php)
  9. LOD-LAM Incubator. Rachel, DLF. Practical application of linked open data in libraries, archives, and museums. Funding: Planning and Startup Grants [BibApp+Zotero/Mendeley funding?]. Kickstarter-type web site for projects.
  10. Project Shizuku. [See presentation from C4L11]. Making friends in libraries. Supporting encounters among library users

Thursday, February 9, 2012. Keynote
Bethany (@nowviskie), ScholarsLab, UVa
Lazy Consensus, How Impatient People Can Change the World
How to move world forces, even against their will. Wielding lazy consensus because it's already being wielded against you.
Lazy consensus = "Yes" becomes the default. Saying "If you can't be bothered to speak a timely "yes" or "no" then you probably don't care enough about this matter to formulate an opinion."
It may be a socially contract, but it's practically a natural law.
[Watch Dark City movie]
[Watch this with staff again later]

Thursday, February 9, 2012. Lightning Talks

  1. Title. David Uspal, Villanova. Projects: Interactive Map, Tap Campus Tour, URL Manager
  2. Adding Hathi Trust records to your Solr-based index (Blacklight, VuFind). Robert, UVa
  3. DJango-based Discovery Layer
  4. Turbo MARC in YAZ. Dennis Schafroth, Index Data [Watch this again]

[Left early. Watch missed talks]